Fauno en Piedra

Robert Rauschenberg, Self Portrait “Black Mountain”, 1952

Robert Rauschenberg, Self Portrait “Black Mountain”, 1952

vivipiuomeno:

Edward Weston - nude through window

vivipiuomeno:

Edward Weston - nude through window

vivipiuomeno:

Alain Fleischer - dans le cadre miroir - 1984 (scan from posterized pic)

vivipiuomeno:

Alain Fleischer - dans le cadre miroir - 1984 (scan from posterized pic)

gacougnol:

Mick Lindberg
vivipiuomeno:

Mark Sink ph. - Window’s light - collodion wet plate

vivipiuomeno:

Mark Sink ph. - Window’s light - collodion wet plate

gacougnol:

Val TelbergAcrobats 1953–54

gacougnol:

Val Telberg
Acrobats
1953–54

vivipiuomeno:

Val Telberg ph. - Untitled, 1948

vivipiuomeno:

Val Telberg ph. - Untitled, 1948

historicaltimes:

People posing next to the Statue of Liberty as it’s unpacked, 1886

historicaltimes:

People posing next to the Statue of Liberty as it’s unpacked, 1886

asylum-art:

Henrique Oliveira

In the world of contemporary art, when you ask an artist about the messages that he/she is trying to convey, you are most likely to receive a pompous answer/just another boring cliché. This was not the case with Henrique Oliveira, the Brazilian emerging artist known for his spatial wooden pieces whose irregular forms devour large spaces which give you the sense that you are actually inhabiting someone’s body.  His answer had no unnecessary use of any conceptual lingo. ”I believe that the message is never art itself, but instead, the lack of a message is a characteristic that makes some creations interesting to me,” he says, adding ”my works may propose a spatial experience, an aesthetic feeling, a language development and many more nominations to refer to the relation it establishes with the viewer. But, any attempt to find a message would fail.”.